Tag Archives: myth

Through the Sapphire Sky: The protector of cedar forests

Lady English Blogger, Sapphire Sky, living in Japan, writes about cedar trees and a famous Western myth called Gilgamesh:

Whenever I walk through cedar forests or come across giant cedar trees, I find myself thinking of Humbaba

( who is also known as Huwawa ), the monstrous guardian spirit of the Cedar Forest where the gods lived. Humbaba is featured in the Epic of Gilgamesh in Sumerian/ Babylonian mythologies which contain the well known flood myths.

I have been a big fan of Humbaba since childhood. I think one of the most enjoyable things about reading myths is coming across interesting mythological figures. I suppose you too have your favorite gods, goddesses, heroes, heroines, or spirits in mythology.

In one of the myths, Gilgamesh, hero and god, king of Uruk…

Continue reading at  Through the Sapphire Sky: The protector of cedar forests.

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Writing Strategies 1, session 6: June 3rd, 2011

  1. Tell your Greek or Roman myth to your partner. How is it similar to the Japanese myth you wrote last week?
  2. How to write references 参照文献の書き方。

    参照文献
    参照文献 MLA style
  3. Subject line for emails

    Email subject line 件名の正しい書き方
  4. Vote for the best Amazon review.
  5. Discussion about myth:
    1. What is a myth? Is a myth the same as a folk-tale (昔話)? Are they different? How are they different?
    2. Is a myth different from a fairy-story, or is it the same? How are they different? How are they the same?
    3. What is the difference between a myth and an epic poem such as Heike Monogatari?
    4. What is the difference between a myth and a novel such as the Tale of Genji?
    5. What is the difference between a myth and a legend, such as The One Inch Boy?
  6. Chapter 4 quiz questions. We checked the answers. Also “you can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.”
  7. LWW, study guide questions for chapters 5 and 6 (pages 18-19, questions 1-8).

Homework:

  1. Finish the study guide questions for chapters 5 and 6, pages 20-22, up to and including question 9.
  2. Re-write your bibliography for your Greek/Roman myth correctly (see the handout), and email it to me by midnight Wednesday.

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Writing Strategies 1, session 5: May 27th, 2011

Myths of Greece and Rome. From Velvet Moon's blog ブルフィンチ『ギリシア・ローマ神話』 Click image to visit
  1. Homework check: are there any publications in Japanese like the Spark Notes?
  2. Homework check: Choose the best customer review – in pairs, then in groups of 4/5
  3. Check answers to the Study Guide questions for chapters 3 and 4

Homework:

By next Friday, June 3rd: read a Greek, or Roman myth and summarise it

  1. in English (200-300 words).
  2. Add the references (quote your sources): where, in which books/websites did you find the myth? Write the name of the source in the correct MLA format at the bottom of your paper, like this: 「姓, 名. タイトル [またはタイトル」. 出版した地名: 出版会社, 出版した年.」という風に書く。E.g. Suzuki, Kazuaki. Kenkou no Zatsugaku. Tokyo: Kodansha, 2008.
    1. Do not translate the Japanese title into English.
    2. Do not write the Japanese title in kanji, but in Roman letters.
  3. And write a short paragraph about the similarities to the Japanese myth you wrote about. What are the common characteristics?
  4. Email me your best Amazon review and why you chose it, by Monday 23:59.
  5. I will post all the students’ chosen reviews on this blog.
    1. Please visit this blog again between Wednesday and Friday.
    2. Read your classmates’ chosen reviews and choose the best one.
    3. Write down the number, and bring it to class next Friday.
  6. Please think about the following questions. We will discuss them in class, Friday, June 3rd. You don’t have to write about these for your homework: 以下の質問は次回の授業に議論します。議論できる予習をしてください。
    1. What is a myth? Is a myth the same as a folk-tale (昔話)? Are they different? How are they different?
    2. Is a myth different from a fairy-story, or is it the same? How are they different? How are they the same?
    3. What is the difference between a myth and an epic poem such as Heike Monogatari?
    4. What is the difference between a myth and a novel such as the Tale of Genji?
    5. What is the difference between a myth and a legend, such as The One Inch Boy?
Turkish Delight
Turkish Delight

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Writing Strategies 1, session 4: May 20th, 2011

Marble sarcophagus with the myth of Endymion
Marble sarcophagus with the myth of Endymion. Photo by peterjr1961 on Flickr. Click image to visit

 

  1. Quiz on LWW chapters 3
  2. Check Study Guide answers for Vocabulary and 1-4 (on pages 15 + 16)
  3. Personal interviews

Homework:

  1. Study Guide questions for chapters 3 and 4, questions 5-10 (pages 16-17). (“For discussion” and “Optional Writing Project” are both options. You get extra points if you do them, but you don’t have to.)
  2. By next (Friday May 27th): are there any publications in Japanese like the Spark Notes for “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”? (see handout). If so, where can they be found and/or bought? What are the contents like? Are they useful?
  3. By next (Friday May 27th), find 10 customer reviews in Japanese about “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” (for example on Amazon Japan), and choose the best one (in your opinion).
    1. The reviews can be about the original English book or the  Japanese translation, it doesn’t matter. Reviews of this book are OK, too.
    2. The 10 customer reviews should include both positive and negative reviews.
    3. Print out the best one and bring it to class.
    4. Be prepared to explain to the class why you think it is a good review.
  4. By the Friday after next (June 3rd): read a Greek, or Roman myth and summarise it
    1. in English (200-300 words).
    2. And write a short paragraph about the similarities to the Japanese myth you wrote about. What are the common characteristics?
    3. Please think about the following questions:
      1. What is a myth? Is a myth the same as a folk-tale (昔話)? Are they different? How are they different?
      2. Is a myth different from a fairy-story, or is it the same? How are they different? How are they the same?
      3. What is the difference between a myth and an epic poem such as Heike Monogatari?
      4. What is the difference between a myth and a novel such as the Tale of Genji?
      5. What is the difference between a myth and a legend, such as The One Inch Boy?

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Writing Strategies 1, session 2: May 6th, 2011

 

Pan and Psyche by Edward Burne-Jones, 1874
Pan and Psyche by Edward Burne-Jones via hotgothiclayouts

In today’s session:

  1. Please do the homework, even if you are late: my job is
    1. to teach you, and
    2. to assess you – do you keep your promises? Do you keep deadlines?
  2. Report format (see below) for May 18th homework.
  3. Study Guides
  4. Translate first paragraph (pages 1-2)
  5. Study Guide, chapters 1-2, vocabulary questions 1-9 (pp. 9-12). Answer the questions for homework.
  6. check our answers to the homework questions
    1. what is myth?
    2. Find out what the following mythic creatures are – find the Japanese name or translation, and find an image for each one (click the links to see some images for each word): faun, nymph, dryad, naiad, jinn, satyr, centaur, minotaur
  7. quiz on these words: write the English that you hear AND the Japanese meaning.

Homework:

  1. Finish reading chapters 1 and 2 and answer the Study Guide questions for chapters 1 and 2.
  2. For May 18th, write a brief account of a Japanese myth (200 words).
    1. Write it in Microsoft Word or a similar word-processing software.
    2. use the format below
    3. double-spaced
    4. Use spell-check.
    5. Use word-count.
    6. Save the file as “Writing Strategies Japanese Myth Your Name”.
    7. Send it as an attachment to me by email by Wednesday midnight, May 18th.
    8. The email subject 件名 must be “Writing Strategies Japanese Myth Your Name”.

College paper format

college paper format

(Thanks to Mr. Lopate’s blog “Writing Tips & Hints” for the image of the college paper format)

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