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Research in English (Linguistics) A session 4: May 13th, 2011

Spanish Fly? or ...
Spanish Fly? Or ...
or Spanish fly?
... or Spanish fly?
  1. Quiz on chapter 1
  2. We will finish reading chapter 1.

Homework:

  1. Write a summary (about 100 words) in Japanese of today’s lesson and your personal comment: did you learn something new or interesting in today’s class? Did you find a comparison or connection with Japanese language and/or society?
    1. Send me your summary and comment by email by Tuesday midnight.
  2. What is the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis? Be prepared to explain it to the class next week.
    1. Click here for the Wikipedia entry in English, and here for the one in Japanese.
    2. Quote your source using the correct MLA format (see handout). You need to cite the reference in the text AND in a list 参照文献 at the end.

    Edward Sapir and Benjamin Lee Whorf
    Edward Sapir and Benjamin Lee Whorf. Photo from Bahas on Multiply (click image to visit source).

Writing Strategies 1, session 3: May 13th, 2011

Cave Hotel - would Mr. Tumnus like this one, do you think? Photo from The Telegraph. Clink image to visit source page)
  1. Check answers to the Study Guide questions for chapters 1 and 2.
  2. Quiz on chapters 1 and 2

Homework:

  1. By midnight Friday May 13th write a short summary of today’s class and send it to me by email. Subject (件名):WS May 13 comment Full Name
    1. what did we do today? Did you learn something new? Something interesting? What do you remember about today’s class?
  2. By midnight Wednesday May 18th, write a brief account of a Japanese myth (200 words) and send it to me as an attachment.
    1. Write it in Microsoft Word or a similar word-processing software.
    2. use the “college paper” format – see the image below, or watch this 10-minute video that shows you how to format MS Word 2007
    3. double-spaced
    4. Use spell-check.
    5. Use word-count.
    6. Save the file as “Writing Strategies Japanese Myth Your Name”.
    7. Send it as an attachment to me by email by Wednesday midnight, May 18th.
    8. The email subject 件名 must be “Writing Strategies Japanese Myth Your Name”.
  3. By next class (Friday May 20th), read LWW chapters 3 and 4, and answer the Study Guide questions Vocabulary and 1-4 (on pages 15 + 16).
  4. By the class after next (Friday May 27th): are there any publications in Japanese like the Spark Notes for “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”? (see handout). If so, where can they be found and/or bought? What are the contents like? Are they useful?
  5. By the class after next (Friday May 27th), find 10 customer reviews in Japanese about “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” (for example on Amazon Japan), and choose the best one (in your opinion).  It doesn’t matter if the original book is the English version or the Japanese translation. Reviews of this book are OK, too. The 10 customer reviews should include both positive and negative reviews. Print out the best one and bring it to class. Be prepared to explain to the class why you think it is a good review.
  6. College paper format College paper format. (Image courtesy of Mr. Lopate’s “Writing Tips and Hints” blog. Click the image to visit the blog)

Writing Strategies 1, session 2: May 6th, 2011

 

Pan and Psyche by Edward Burne-Jones, 1874
Pan and Psyche by Edward Burne-Jones via hotgothiclayouts

In today’s session:

  1. Please do the homework, even if you are late: my job is
    1. to teach you, and
    2. to assess you – do you keep your promises? Do you keep deadlines?
  2. Report format (see below) for May 18th homework.
  3. Study Guides
  4. Translate first paragraph (pages 1-2)
  5. Study Guide, chapters 1-2, vocabulary questions 1-9 (pp. 9-12). Answer the questions for homework.
  6. check our answers to the homework questions
    1. what is myth?
    2. Find out what the following mythic creatures are – find the Japanese name or translation, and find an image for each one (click the links to see some images for each word): faun, nymph, dryad, naiad, jinn, satyr, centaur, minotaur
  7. quiz on these words: write the English that you hear AND the Japanese meaning.

Homework:

  1. Finish reading chapters 1 and 2 and answer the Study Guide questions for chapters 1 and 2.
  2. For May 18th, write a brief account of a Japanese myth (200 words).
    1. Write it in Microsoft Word or a similar word-processing software.
    2. use the format below
    3. double-spaced
    4. Use spell-check.
    5. Use word-count.
    6. Save the file as “Writing Strategies Japanese Myth Your Name”.
    7. Send it as an attachment to me by email by Wednesday midnight, May 18th.
    8. The email subject 件名 must be “Writing Strategies Japanese Myth Your Name”.

College paper format

college paper format

(Thanks to Mr. Lopate’s blog “Writing Tips & Hints” for the image of the college paper format)

Research in English (Linguistics) A session 3: May 6th, 2011

What is language?
What is language? By dgray_xplane on Flickr, via nfp 2.0 http://www.nfp2.co.uk/2007/06/01/doing-things-together/index.html
  1. Quiz on session 2
  2. What is language?
  3. We continued reading chapter 1 of “Mother Tongue”: pages 14-17. In these pages, the author Bryson discusses the following topics:
    1. words that exist in other languages that do not exist in English, e.g. “Schadenfreude” and the Scottish word that means “the habit of dropping in on people at mealtimes”. Bryson suggests that the existence of certain words in a particular language tells us something about the character of the people who speak it.
      1. We discussed whether we think this is true or not.
      2. We cane up with some Japanese examples: wabi/sabi, もったいない、どちでもいい(あいまいの文化) and 気
    2. “The Eskimos, as is well known, have 50 words for types of snow” (p. 14). This may be an urban legend. Here is a link to an article that reviews “The Mother Tongue” and discusses some of the many errors of fact that can be found in it.
    3. The various unappetizing words in Italian for different types of pasta, including the memorable “strangled priests“! However, we should remember English also has some unappetizing food names, e.g. “Hot dog, spotted dick, faggots in gravy, toad-in-the-hole“. (Click on each link to see some pictures).

Homework:

  1. Write a short summary (100-200 words) of what we read today in the textbook. Use the following format.
College paper format
College paper format. (Image courtesy of Mr. Lopate's "Writing Tips and Hints" blog. Click the image to visit the blog)


  • Each of the following expressions from page 17 has two meanings, a literal meaning and an idiomatic meaning. Find both meanings for each expression:
    1. take French leave
    2. Dutch courage
    3. French letters
    4. Spanish fly
    5. Mexican carwash
  • Welcome

    Weeping cherry しだれ桜 - 氷室神社、奈良
    Weeping cherry しだれ桜 - 氷室神社、奈良

    Welcome to the class blog for Sheffner’s 2011 classes at DWC: Research in English and Writing Strategies.

    Please leave a comment. To protect your privacy, I suggest you do not use your full name, but only your family name or your given name. Your name will be visible. Your email address will not be visible.

    I’m looking forward to teaching you this year. I like to teach:

    • I have been interested in language since I was a child, particularly in the history of English words.
    • I am interested in British culture, especially in those parts of British culture which have had a large impact on the world, including Japan.
    • I enjoy helping people to understand things more deeply and to develop their intelligence by making finer and finer distinctions.

    (You can find out more about me by visiting here and here.)