Tag Archives: week 1

WS1, week 1, April 14th, 2017

Welcome, to Sheffner’s WS1 class blog.

On this blog I will post classwork and homework assignments each week. I will update the blog at the weekend after each Friday’s class.

If you miss a class, or forget the homework, check out the blog.

Homework:

  1. Visit this class blog and leave a comment.
    1. To leave a comment, click on the words “Leave a reply”  below this blog.
    2. You need to type in your name (family name only) and an email address. Your email address will NOT be public. Your  name WILL be public.
    3. All comments are moderated. That means I must approve them. So your comment will not appear  immediately.  Please be patient.
  2. Send me an email briefly  introducing yourself and saying what you hope to learn in this class. What do you want to be able to do by the end of this course?
  3. Read chapter 1 and write a short summary of the key events.

AS1, week 1, April 14th, 2017

Welcome, to Sheffner’s AS1 class blog.

On this blog I will post classwork and homework assignments each week. I will update the blog at the weekend after each Friday’s class.

If you miss a class, or forget the homework, check out the blog.

Homework:

  1. Visit this class blog and leave a comment.
    1. To leave a comment, click on the words “Leave a reply” below this blog post.
    2. You need to type in your name (family name only) and an email address. Your email address will NOT be public. Your  name WILL be public.
    3. All comments are moderated. That means I must approve them. So your comment will not appear  immediately.  Please be patient.
  2. Send me an email briefly  introducing yourself and saying what you hope to learn in this class. What do you want to be able to do by the end of this course?
  3. Read chapter 1 in the textbook.
  4. Choose EITHER a movie  OR an easy-reading book from the list and start watching it or reading it.

AS2, week 1, September 25, 2015

Homework

  • Txtbk
    • p2 Timeline,
    • p5 Reading 1,
    • p6 Colonial America + comprehension questions.
  • Go to library and find easy reading  book about US history and US movies.
  • Borrow one book and one movie. Read the book, watch the movie.

Today’s class

  1. What do you know about early (pre-1776) American history?
    1. Make a list of
      1. people, and
      2. places, things, events
  2. “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”
    1. Translate into Japanese.
  3. Listen to my mini-lecture, take notes, and list the two reasons why I think studying history is important and interesting.
  4. Listen to my mini-lecture, take notes, and list the two reasons why I think it is a good idea to use movies to study about US history.
  5. Movies are a vital part of American culture. Certain scenes from movies have permeated the national consciousness.
  6. E.g., from “The Wizard of Oz”, we have the image of the yellow brick road (which was the title of a pop-song by British singer-songwriter Elton John), and the lines “We’re not in Kansas any more” and the image of the “man behind the curtain”.
  7. List some American movies you have seen. Check if they are related to US history.

Welcome! Ws1, wk1, April 10th, 2015

IMG_7783

Today was an introductory class.

  • I asked some questions about how students feel about their English and their learning.
  • Then I explained a theory of language learning which distinguishes between learning and acquisition
  • Students introduced themselves briefly.
  • Then students answered a survey about their reading habits.
  • Finally, students identified descriptions of British towns and located them on a map of the UK.

Homework

  • Get a B5 looseleaf binder for this class
  • Find something to read in Enlgish which is easy and interesting for you. (“Easy” means you can understand 90% of it without needing a dictionary.)
  • Read it and bring it to class next Friday.

Welcome! As1, wk1, April 10th, 2015

IMG_7796Today was an introductory class.

  • I asked some questions about how you feel about your English and your learning.
  • Then I explained a theory of language learning which distinguishes between learning and acquisition
  • Then students answered a survey about their reading habits.

Homework

  • Get a B5 looseleaf binder for this class
  • Find something to read in Enlgish which is easy and interesting for you. (“Easy” means you can understand 90% of it without needing a dictionary.)
  • Read it and bring it to class next Friday.

 

SinEb, wk1, September 26th 2014

Hello, everyone. Welcome to Studies in English B (SinEb).

It is almost exactly 2 months since the last class in the first semester. I hope you enjoyed your 2 months’ holiday.

This semester will be more or less the same as last semester, except that

  • we will spend more time practicing writing about linguistics topics, both for classwork and for homework.
  • I will give more precise instruction in how to write.
  • presentations will begin later in the semester.

Homework:

  1. Are all possible combinations of Japanese sounds used in the Japanese language?
  2. Write 5 possible combinations which are not actually used.

Today’s class

  1. Imagine you are teaching someone Japanese.
    1. Choose one Japanese sound and describe/explain how to make this sound.
    2. Look at handout #1 which has a table showing the main consonant sounds in English together with their scientific names and a description.
    3. Look at handout #2 which has a diagram of the human head showing the different positions for making the main English vowel sounds.
  2. Using handout #1, what English sounds are difficult for you to make?
  3. What kinds of sounds are difficult for ventriloquists to make? Why?
  4. What English sounds are also used in Japanese?
    1. What English sounds are NOT used in Japanese?
  5. What Japanese sounds are NOT used in English?
  6. What parts of the mouth are important when making vowel sounds?
  7. Invent a name for a new brand of Japanese car or drink or cartoon character.

american english pronunciation

Vowel Sounds

WS2, wk1, September 26th 2014

Hello, everyone. Welcome to Writing Strategies 2.

It is almost exactly 2 months since the last class in the first semester. I hope you enjoyed your 2 months’ holiday.

This semester will be more or less the same as last semester, except that

  • you will spend more time practicing writing , both for classwork and for homework.
  • you will discuss and write about different aspects of the story.

Homework

  1. Answer the short (1 or 2 word-answers) questions about chapter 2.
  2. Read again the answers for the “short essay questions” for chapter 1
  3. Write answers to the “short essay questions” for chapter 2.

Today’s class

  1. Essays from semester 1
  2. quizzes from semester 1 last class
  3. read and answer the short-answer questions for chapter 1
  4. Check the answers.
  5. 4 kinds of writing we will do in this semester
    1. Recount – tell what happened. This is what you wrote when you wrote the chapter summaries last semester.
    2. Describe – what kind of boy is Digory? What is Charn like? What is Jadis like?
    3. Explain – why things happened, why people acted in certain ways. E.g. “Why did Digory hit the bell in Charn?”
    4. Argue – give reasons for your opinion and persuade the reader, e.g. “Why did CS Lewis write this story? Why should young people today read this story?”

Welcome to Sheffner’s 2013 Studies in English A, week 1: April 11th, 2014

The scope of linguistics
The scope of linguistics

Welcome to Sheffner’s 2013 Studies in English I class blog. Thank you for visiting. I look forward to teaching you and learning with you this year.

This blog will be updated weekly. Each week there will be a summary of the lesson and the homework details.

Textbook: There is no textbook for this course. However, students will need a looseleaf notebook. From time to time I will give you handouts. Additional information (links, videos, etc.) will be available on this blog.

Click the images to see a bigger version.

CIMG9796qtr

Weeping cherry in Himuro Jinja, Nara city.

Homework

  1. Send me an email with a short self introduction. Use the correct format.

    English Email format
    English email format
  2. Leave a comment here on this blog by clicking the words “Leave a comment” . The comment is: “Tell us something you know about linguistics and/or how you feel about linguistics, or something about linguistics you are interested in.”
    1. For your privacy, when leaving a comment, use your family name only or use a nickname.
    2. If you use a nickname, please tell me your nickname when you send me your email.
    1. To leave a comment, you must first type in your email address. Please use your school email address.
  3. Homework deadline: Tuesday (April 15th) midnight (23:59).

In this course, students will

  • have group discussions,
  • do lots of writing in English
  • learn about academic writing formats
  • make 2 formal presentations to the whole class,
  • and write a final paper in English.

Some of the topics we might find out about:

  • the sounds of English (phonemes and phonetics) and their corresponding written forms (graphemes)
  • some rules of English spelling
  • do men and women talk differently?
  • how do children learn language?
  • what is the difference between human and animal languages? Between human and computer languages?
  • the origins of words, including common prefixes and suffixes, and word roots (morphemes, Greek and Latin influences)
  • the history of the English language (Anglo-Saxon, Celtic, Middle and modern English)
  • English pronunciation and how it has changed over the centuries,  and different dialects and accents
  • learn about syllables, how to count them in English (poetry, haiku)
  • compare aspects of English with other languages, especially other European languages and Japanese

 

Welcome to Sheffner’s 2014 Writing Strategies I, week 1: April 11th, 2014

Welcome to Sheffner’s 2014 Writing Strategies I class blog. Thank you for visiting.

This blog will be updated weekly. Each week there will be a summary of the lesson and the homework details.

Click the images to see a bigger version.

CIMG9796qtr

Weeping cherry in Himuro Jinja, Nara city.

Homework

  1. Send me an email: what did we do in today’s class and your comment.
    1. Use the proper email format

      English Email format
      English email format
  2. Leave a comment here on this blog by clicking the words “Leave a comment” at the bottom of this post (投稿).
    1. The comment topic is: “Tell us about your favourite English story, or your favourite Japanese children’s story.”
    2. For your privacy, when leaving a comment, use your family name only or use a nickname.
    3. If you use a nickname, please tell me your nickname when you send me your email.
    4. To leave a comment, you must first type in your email address. Please use your school email address.
  3. Homework deadline for #1 and #2 above: Tuesday (April 15th) midnight (23:59).
  4. Watch the movie of “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” (LWW), or read the book (in English or in Japanese). There is no deadline for this homework, but you will enjoy “The Magician’s Nephew” more and understand it better if you know the story of LWW.
  5. Group 1 – prepare to explain about the first 8 pages (first half) of chapter 1 to the class next week.
  6. Group 2 – prepare to explain about the second half of chapter 1 to the class next week.

In today’s class, we

  1. Received Sheffner’s contact information and blog address, and the outline of this course.
  2. Did some freewriting and started reading chapter 1

Textbooks:

  1. This semester we will be reading & discussing C.S. Lewis’ Narnia story, “The Magician’s Nephew”. You can buy it on Amazon Japan. Click here. You can buy a good 2nd-hand copy from as little as ¥120! Click here. I use a Kindle version which I can read on my iPhone or iPad. Click here for the Kindle version.There is a Japanese translation, which costs just ¥1 on Amazon Japan!

I look forward to teaching you and learning with you this semester. In this class this semester, we will

  • read a C.S. Lewis’ story
  • learn something about C.S. Lewis himself
  • learn about academic writing formats
  • make 1 or 2 presentations
  • write a final paper in English.

Why read “The Magician’s Nephew” (TMN)?

  1. It is a very famous children’s story in the English-speaking world.
  2. You can learn about British culture and history (a little) by reading it
  3. You can learn about Christianity
  4. Christianity is an important part of Western culture
  5. It is a children’s story, so it is relatively easy to read
  6. It is not a textbook, but an original story written for native-speaking English children.
C.S. LewisC.S. Lewis